Town Hall

Town Hall

Douglas County Democrats

Douglas County Democrats

Monday, July 31, 2017

What Native American Art Means in American Culture

PRWeb

 by Steven Onida
Native American culture has taken the world by storm over the past few years, proving that contemporary artists can thrive in the world of art, in general. However, the team at NativeAmericanJewelry.com is looking to push this even further by showing people what Native American art truly means.
The company has stood as a platform for Native artists to showcase their work to the public, imbibing a new generation with the ideals and history of Native American culture and history.
NativeAmericanJewelry.com spokesman, Steven Onida, commented, "It’s our firm belief that when the general public learns more about Native culture, they learn more about being an American. When you learn the history and culture that’s impacted our country in such a profound way, you’ll have a greater respect for the country as a whole. When we think about Native art, we typically think the traditional sterling silver and turquoise jewelry, decorative pottery, and Kachina dolls. What people don’t see is the inlay snake symbol, coiled around the stone, symbolizing healing, rebirth, and a general charm of good luck. People tend to miss the importance of symbolism, the meaning behind each piece. We’re here to fill in that gap."
From hand-made beaded jewelry, coral bracelets, and striking Kachina figures, NativeAmericanJewelry.com represents some of the most talented artists in the Southwest region. Their art tells the story of their history and culture.
Onida and his team are committed to providing talented artists with a platform in which people can interact with the finer details of Native American art.
Onida added, “Using one of our pieces as an example, Zuni artist George Phillip’s made a stunning corn stalk Kokopelli pendant, there’s a great deal of meaning in this work that American audiences would usually miss. Most people that live in the Southwest might be familiar with Kokopelli. He’s everywhere. Kokopelli is a fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player. His outline can be seen in museums, on city street decorum, and all over the Southwest, but people don’t usually take the time to appreciate the meaning. This piece shows Kokopelli with a stock of corn. These two symbols come together to form something completely new. Corn is a common symbol that generalizes crops, corn being the most abundant crop grown by the Native peoples. This combination of symbols can be interpreted to bring the wearer a bountiful crop or good fortune in a modern translation. This is just one small example. Almost every Native American piece tells a story, you simply have to listen.”
The team at NativeAmericanJewelry.com is proud to release a new set of jewelry that prominently features these symbols. Anyone interested in learning more about interpretations, symbolism, and history, can also find them on NAJ’s website, here.
Among the many new pieces, people will have the chance to purchase bear symbol jewelry, to provide strength and courage, water wave pieces to bring life and good health, and wolf jewelry to embrace their positive features like loyalty, compassion, and fearlessness.

Meet the Candidate: Shane Starkey

Candidate Questionnaire


photographer Kevin Surbaugh
What sets you apart from other candidates? 
 What sets me apart from the other candidates is that I have already served on the city council for a four-year term. The learning curve for a new council member might take months or even years before they fully understand the responsibilities of being on the city council. I believe that I am prepared to start leading our community immediately.

What aspects of your personal history, accomplishments, and personal philosophy make you the best possible choice in this election cycle? 
 My background is that of an independent business owner. I believe that city government should be run efficiently as a business. While I was on the city council, I voted on every issue for what I believed was in the best interest of the city as a whole.


 What do you see as the most important issue this election? 
 I believe that the most important issues in the next four years are job growth and attracting more people to want to live in Baldwin City.



What would you do to ensure the community you hope to represent is a livable community? 
 A livable community needs to be balanced by expenses and services. If the city council makes our city the cheapest city to live in, our services to the community would need to be cut. If there is excessive spending I would seek to eliminate that to save the tax payers money if it did not reduce the quality of life and services that Baldwin City residents are accustomed to.


 If money were no obstacle, what is one project you’d like to see the city move forward on? 
 If money were no obstacle I would love to see The Lumberyard Arts Center become the anchor to a very vibrant downtown community that draws people from out of town to enjoy many dining, entertainment, and retail businesses.


Polls show most voters don't think government works. What would you do to reform the underlying structures and systems that seem to be a major cause of the problem? 
 Polls are public perception, not necessarily reality.



Do you think eliminating obsolete laws, regulations (and bureaucracies) would help reduce wasteful spending in government? And if so, how would you do it? 
 Obsolete by definition is "no longer produced or used; out of date." I am not aware of any obsolete laws that are costing tax payers money. However, if someone would bring a specific law to me I would do my best to correct the issue.





 Do you think state and local civil service rules make it harder to cut wasteful spending and to efficiently manage public agencies? If so, what would you do about it? 
 I believe that there is a lot of wasteful spending on the national and state level. While I was on the council, I worked to keep our mill levy as low as possible and will do so the next four years as well.





What is your position on the Baldwin City Recreation Center? 
 My questions on the Recreation Center has always been, does the majority of the community (including the school district) want it and how will it be paid for.

Lieutenant-Governor Jeff Colyer Issues Statement

Press Release

TOPEKA – Lieutenant-Governor Jeff Colyer today issued the below statement following the announcement of Governor Sam Brownback’s presidential nomination to Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom:
Official State Picture Lt. Governor
Jeff Colyer
“Sam Brownback has served our state and our citizens with distinction. I will be forever grateful for his service.
“As a doctor and a father of three beautiful girls, I am always optimistic for the future. As I’ve served in worn-torn countries, helping victims begin the healing process, I’ve seen first-hand the resilience of human beings. A Reagan alumni, I too believe people have an inherent dignity, requiring a respect for vulnerable life and civility for our fellow man.
“With humility and a deep sense of honor, I look forward to working with Kansans from across the state, listening to their vision for the future, as together we move toward a better tomorrow for the place that we love.”

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback Nominated For State Dept. Post

Kansas News Service   Stephen Koranda reports for the Kansas News Service on Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback's nomination to head the Office of International Religious Freedom.

Gov. Sam Brownback on Thursday touted his credentials and passion for helping the Trump administration mitigate religious persecution around the globe.
The prospective ambassador-at-large for international religious freedom said he does not know how long it might take for the U.S. Senate to consider his nomination by President Donald Trump, and he hasn’t yet decided when to turn over the reins to his lieutenant governor, Jeff Colyer.
In a 35-minute Statehouse news conference, Brownback also reflected on his years at the helm of Kansas. He stood by his signature 2012 tax cuts, which the Legislature scuttled last month.
That the tax cuts didn’t pan out as expected was due to the price of commodities like wheat and oil, he said.
Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback speaks to the state
legislature in 2016. President Trump has nominated
Brownback for a State Department post.
Photographer Orlin Wagner/AP
“We were in recession — a commodity-driven recession,” he said, “and you’re seeing multiple states wrestle with that set of issues.”
Brownback said the tax plan had led to the formation of record numbers of small businesses, but he added that it probably should have included a cap on tax exemptions for those companies.
The two-term governor’s chops as a social conservative also were on display. He touted his efforts to restrict abortion in Kansas and reiterated his belief that traditional family structure is declining, which he described as a critical challenge for the state.
On his potential move to the U.S. State Department, where he would head the Office of International Religious Freedom, he said the work is urgent. While in the U.S. Senate, Brownback voted for the 1998 bill, known as the International Religious Freedom Act, that created the office.
“We passed a bill in 1998 and the situation hasn’t improved,” he said. “You could easily argue it’s gotten worse.”
Kansas’ 46th governor, a Catholic, said the role of faith in his own life informs his concern for others around the world. He struggled with his emotions as he described attending church earlier in the day and knowing that people in some parts of the world risk their lives to do so.
“I went and I did something that is simple and done by millions of Americans every day,” he said, “and some have faced death for doing it. I took communion.”
Brownback said persecution affects all faiths.
Asked about accusations that the Trump administration has engaged in religious discrimination with its design of a travel ban targeting several majority Muslim countries, Brownback said the administration has its eye on protecting religious rights for all.
“I know they’re interested in the issues of religious liberty and religious freedom — that’s been clearly communicated,” he said. “And it’s for all faiths. It’s freedom of religion for all faiths.”
Brownback’s potential departure had been the focus of speculation for months, with multiple news outlets reporting on signs of an impending decision by the Trump administration.
Trump revealed Wednesday he would nominate Brownback — who is more than halfway through his second four-year term — for the State Department position, which includes monitoring and responding to attacks on religious freedom around the globe.
Brownback declined to say how long he had been in talks with the Trump administration about the position.
In an interview published earlier Thursday by WORLD Magazine, Brownback said he and Vice President Mike Pence spoke about the post as early as last year, after the presidential election but before Trump and Pence took office.
Brownback’s time as governor became increasingly embattled in recent years. In his first term, conservative allies swept legislative elections, winning enough seats to collaborate with him on overhauling the state’s tax structures in 2012 and 2013.
The massive tax cuts, which included exemptions for owners of more than 330,000 farms and small businesses, were billed as “a shot of adrenaline” for the Kansas economy.
But year after year, state revenues didn’t perform as hoped, leading the governor and Legislature to cut into budgets for state agencies, universities and schools, at times mid-fiscal year.
The instability fed public angst about the quality of education, roads and other government services, and the ensuing political backlash helped Democrats and moderate Republicans wrest legislative seats from conservatives in 2016.
At the end of its 2017 session, the Legislature scuttled Brownback’s signature tax cuts — and then overrode his veto of the effort.
Brownback’s lieutenant governor, fellow conservative Republican Colyer, is a plastic surgeon and former state lawmaker from Overland Park.
Colyer led the Brownback administration’s effort to privatize Medicaid, creating the system now called KanCare.



Celia Llopis-Jepsen is a reporter for the Kansas News Service, a collaboration of KCUR, Kansas Public Radio and KMUW covering health, education and politics. You can reach her on Twitter @Celia_LJ. Kansas News Service stories and photos may be republished at no cost with proper attribution and a link back to kcur.org.

DCF Sponsors Summer Conference for Youth in Foster Care

Press Release

TOPEKA - Leaving home and entering college, the workplace, the military or some other endeavor as a young adult can be an intimidating transition. But for youth who don’t have the support of a family, facing realities of being an adult can be especially difficult. This week, at Washburn University in Topeka, dozens of youth in foster care took part in a summer conference to learn how to become independent. The conference wrapped up this afternoon.

“This is an event I look forward to every year,” said Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) Secretary Phyllis Gilmore. “It’s a great opportunity for our staff to connect with older youth, learn their stories, find out how we can help them and encourage them on their journey to independence.”

Left to right: KYAC President Stormy Lukasavage,
shakes Secretary Phyllis Gilmore’s hand
during the recognition of KYAC Leadership.
Secretary Gilmore spoke to approximately 100 older youth on Wednesday, July 26. She recognized the recent high school graduates, asking each about their goals for the future. The Secretary also offered an inspirational message about how, despite their difficult starts in life, they are of value and full of potential.

Every year, approximately 350 youth age out of the Kansas foster care system. They are offered a wide range of services through DCF’s Independent Living program. Most recently, many older youth attended computer camps throughout the state, where they each received a day of instruction and computers and printers to prepare them for school and employment.

Older youth who age out of foster care are also encouraged to participate in the Kansas Youth Advisory Council (KYAC), which is a partner to DCF to advise on issues of concern related to foster care. KYAC members include youth currently in care and those who have recently aged out of the system. The summer conference, this week, was largely designed by KYAC members, and is held each July at Washburn University. The conference is sponsored by DCF, and included this year, workshops and speakers, as well as games, crafts and activities.  

“This conference is beneficial to those who come. We received hygiene bags, pillows and blankets and I know people who don’t have that,” said Shaileigh Piepmeier, a conference attendee who has aged out of foster care. “The conference also provides structure, not only for those in foster care, but people my age too. They can know that this is solid and that it’s going to be here and that they can look forward to it every summer.” 

Some of the workshops that the youth could attend included instructions on filing incoming taxes, financial budgeting, interviewing for jobs, completing college and scholarship applications, self-defense, cooking and sewing.

To learn more about the services offered to youth from foster care, visit www.dcf.ks.gov.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

AT&T Makes Executive Appointments to Prepare for Time Warner Merger Close

PRNewswire

DALLAS, TX -- AT&T Inc.* (NYSE: T) made several executive appointments today in preparation for completing its acquisition of Time Warner Inc., a global media and entertainment leader with HBO, Turner, and Warner Bros. The transaction is currently under review by the United States Department of Justice and competition authorities in certain foreign countries.  Effective August 1, the following executives will assume new positions and will continue to report to AT&T Inc. Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson:
  • In addition to her responsibilities as Global Marketing Officer, Lori Lee will assume leadership of AT&T International. AT&T provides mobile services to more than 13 million consumers and businesses in Mexico, and pay-TV service to more than 13 million subscribers across 11 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean.  Lee was previously lead of AT&T's Time Warner Merger Integration Planning Team.
  • John Stankey, will assume the lead of AT&T's Time Warner Merger Integration Planning Team. He will work closely with Time Warner Inc. Chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes to plan for a smooth leadership transition to Stankey as CEO of AT&T's media company once the merger is complete. Stankey was previously CEO of AT&T Entertainment Group.
  • John Donovan, is named CEO of AT&T Communications, which includes AT&T's Business Solutions, Entertainment Group, and Technology & Operations groups. AT&T provides mobile, broadband and video services to U.S-based consumers and serves nearly 3.5 million businesses, from the smallest companies to nearly all the Fortune 1000. Donovan was previously Chief Strategy Officer and Group President of AT&T Technology and Operations.
"We look forward to completing the deal and delivering for customers the many benefits of this merger," said Stephenson.

Baldwin City Radio Release Second Quarter Stats

Press Release

Baldwin City Radio recently announce their second quarter statistics.

Category 2017 Q2 Totals
Visits to Website 8,250
Unique IP Addresses 2,751
APP Downloads 137
Unique Listeners 594
Time Spent Listening 2.38 hrs/session
Unique Facebook Reach 719
% to Douglas County 92%
Sources: Google Analytics and Nobex Technologies 7/6/17

BaldwinCityRadio.com is a media partner of the Baldwin City Gazette.

Area Happenings - Week of July 29

Here are the upcoming events that the Gazette has been made aware of as of  July 28, 2017.  To submit an item to the community events calendar, please email it to press@baldwingazette.com.

August 5, 2017
Neighbor Helping Neighbor
 8 A.M. - 11:30 A.M.
Back to School Event
 School clothes and furniture (desk, etc) are available. If you are in come by. 

Location:  Lighthouse Baptist
700 Chapel Street
(in the Baker Street parking lot)
Baldwin City, KS

785-594-4101


August 20, 2017

Battlefield Tours Led by John Brown

As part of the Civil War on the Western Frontier activities commemorating the 154th anniversary of Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, Kansas, there will be a special tour of the Black Jack Battlefield. It will be conducted by Kerry Altenbernd as John Brown, assisted by members of the 13th Kansas Infantry Reg. re-enactor group serving as his civilian Free State militia. Maybe a few pro-slavery men will be there too.  
The re-enactors will be camping on site, so come out early and visit with them.

Time: Saturday, June 3 at 4 PM - 5 PM
Free Admission

Location: Black Jack Battlefield and Nature Park
163 E 2000th Rd
Wellsville, Kansas 66092

More Information:
(785) 380-9156
info@blackjackbattlefield.org

August 24, 2017

Thankful Thursday Free Community Meal
Serving 6 to 7 pm
Ives Chapel UMC
1018 Miami
Baldwin City
Free community meals are the last Thursday of each month


August 25, 2017

COME AND ENJOY OUR
COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
          TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to?





HOST
VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
1724 N 692 RD
BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600

September 29, 2017

Luke Bryant Concert



 October 21-22, 2017

Maple Leaf Festival



Downtown Baldwin City



 October 28, 2017

COME AND ENJOY OUR
COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
          TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to?



HOST
VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
1724 N 692 RD
BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600




 December 29, 2017

COME AND ENJOY OUR
COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
          TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to?


HOST
VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
1724 N 692 RD
BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600


Third Friday Art Walk and Farmers Market

Downtown Baldwin City





Every 4th Thursday of the Month
10 A.M. - 11 A.M.
Mobile Food Bank
Baldwin City New Life Assembly of God
118 5th St  Baldwin City, KS
Stay in car, line up and drive through



Every Tuesday through October  
Eudora Local Gardening Farmer’s Market
4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Tuesdays
through October 2016
1402 Church Street
Eudora, KS.
In the parking lot of Gene’s Hartland Foods.
Local, fresh produce and foods offered by local growers and producers!


Every Wednesday through October
De Soto Farmer’s Market (Fresh Promise’s Market)
4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Wednesdays through October 2016
at The Barn at Kill Creek Farm
9200 Kill Creek Road
De Soto, KS
Local, fresh produce and foods offered by local growers and producers!


Every Thursday through October 
Cottin's Hardware Farmer's Market on Thursdays from
4:00 pm - 6:30 pm
through September
at Cottin's Hardware & Rental back parking lot
1832 Massachusetts Street
Lawrence, KS
Local vendors offer a variety of goods including produce, baked items, hot foods, meats, eggs, soaps, jams, jellies, herbs, fudge and much more!;


Every Friday through October
Perry Lecompton Farmers' Market
Fridays from 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm
at Bernie's parking lot
24 Hwy and Ferguson Road
Perry, KS
Visit the market to find fresh vegetables, fruits, homemade jams and jellies, baked goods, honey, fresh cut flowers, farm fresh eggs, handmade crafts and more!



Friday, July 28, 2017

Obituary: Opal Marie Cromer

Opal Marie Cromer
Opal Marie Cromer, 77, of Baldwin City passed away peacefully Wednesday, July 26, 2017 in Baldwin City.
She was born March 1, 1940 in Allen County Kansas the daughter of Roy Fultz and Ila (Broughton) Fultz. Opal was raised in Quenemo, KS and attended Quenemo rural schools and graduated from Quenemo High School in 1958.   After growing up in Quenemo, Opal moved to Topeka, and later to Edgerton and to Baldwin City in 1972.
She was employed at Baker University in the Maintenance Department for 32 years, retiring in 2004
Opal was a Brownie leader for the young girls when living in Edgerton, KS. She also coached girls youth T-ball and softball in Baldwin when the family maintained the city ball fields. She was always very supportive of all her children’s athletics and school events. Opal took a great deal of pride in her plants, flowers and yard work. Most of all Opal loved to spend time with her grandchildren. Her family was her greatest treasure and love.
She was an active member of Ives Chapel United Methodist Church and Lighthouse Baptist Church, both of Baldwin. She was a Sunday school teacher for many years at Ives Chapel and was always very active in both churches. She would find some quiet time in which she enjoyed reading spiritual literature and the bible. Her family will remember two important things about their beloved Opal. She loved ice cream and she was gifted with unconditional love.
Opal was united in marriage to Herb Cromer on May 25, 1961 in Eldorado, KS. They shared over 40 years of marriage until Herb’s death on March 4, 2002.
Opal is preceded in death by her mother and father, husband Herb Cromer and two sisters, Mary Goodon and Lavon Nabors.
Survivors include one daughter, Diane Greenway of Anderson, SC; two sons, Wesley Cromer of Olathe, KS and Stanley Cromer of Baldwin City, KS; one sister, Ginger Murphy of Clearwater, KS; 6 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren that all brought great joy to Opal. Opal is also survived by her extended family members, Diane Jones and Kim Baldwin.
Funeral services will be 11:00 a.m., Saturday July 29, 2017 at Lighthouse Baptist Church, Baldwin City.  Interment will follow at Oakwood, Baldwin City, KS.  The Cromer family will receive friends from 9:30a.m.to 11:00a.m., Saturday, prior to the service at the church.   In lieu of flowers Opal requested memorial contributions be made to Lighthouse Baptist Church and sent c/o Lamb-Roberts Funeral Home, P.O. Box 64, Baldwin City, KS 66006. Condolences may be sent to the family through www.lamb-roberts.com.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Thank You to Strangers

Letters To The Editor

To the Editor:
I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of my sisters and myself, to comment on the kindness that is still present in our world and to extend our heartfelt thanks to two unknown/unnamed gentlemen that came to the aid of our mother.
On July 25 our mother was taking her morning walk when her rolling walker fell off of a curb and she fell face first into the street.  While driving down the street where she fell two very kind gentlemen witnessed her accident and stopped to assist her.  She understandably was shaken up and was not able to get the names of these individuals.  Her hearing is limited so she probably did not hear most of their questions or concerns.  She was also bloodied, bruised and embarrassed by the incident.  Please know that she genuinely appreciates your help.
Since we have no way of finding these two gentlemen this is our attempt to let them know how grateful we are for their efforts to help her and also remark on the kindness of strangers and new neighbors in Baldwin City where our parents now reside.  They have commented often on the warm greetings that they receive when in the community and this episode on July 25th further ingratiates this wonderful city to us.  Whoever you are, wherever you may be, please know how much we appreciate your care and concern.  

Gratefully,
Teresa Kellerman and sisters

Monday, July 24, 2017

Country Star Josh Gracin to Have Concert at The Oread Hotel

Kevin Surbaugh



Country Music star and former American Idol contestant Josh Gracin will be in Lawrence for one show only, Saturday, August 26 at the Oread (1200 Oread Ave). BaldwinRadio.com and LawrenceHits.com announced this past week that they will be the media sponsor, while Jay Wachs will emcee and host the Concert.
According to the Oread web site,
Dinner is at 6:30PM and the concert starts at 8:00PM. There is limited seating. Meal includes filet mignon, salmon or vegetarian entrée. Cash bar for wine and cocktails.

SILVER LEVEL – $125/person includes dinner, 2 Bud Lights, and is behind middle row.
GOLD LEVEL – $150/person includes dinner, 2 Bud Lights, and is middle ballroom seating.
PLATINUM LEVEL – $200/person includes dinner, Bud Lights, first row seating and a “Meet & Greet” on The Nest rooftop bar and terrace. (*3 tables available)
General Admission Seating – Tickets: $50 – concert only, cash bar. Starting at 8:00PM.

Gracin has three alums with fourteen top country singles. Popular songs include “Favorite State of Mind,” “Stay with Me(Brass Bed)” and “I Want to Live.”  For tickets contact Lisa at 785-830-3927 or lkrings@oliviacollection.com

Garmin® acquires Alphamantis™



SCHAFFHAUSEN, Switzerland  -  Kansas City based Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced that it has acquired Alphamantis Technologies Inc., a privately held designer of aerodynamics testing and measurement technology for the cycling industry.
“Alphamantis is on the leading edge of aerodynamics analysis in the cycling world, and that makes the company a perfect fit for our robust suite of bike products,” said Cliff Pemble, Garmin’s president and CEO. “Aerodynamics is another way for cyclists to measure and improve their performance – something our customers crave.”
Alphamantis develops technology that allows typical cyclists to test and refine their drag coefficient in everyday riding conditions, without having to use expensive and time-consuming wind tunnel testing.
The majority of associates will be retained and will continue working in Montreal, Canada. Financial terms of the acquisition will not be released.

SAMHSA Awards KDADS Grant to Continue Work on Homelessness, Mental Illness

Press Release

TOPEKA – The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) Behavioral Health Commission has been awarded a $1.7 million grant to continue its work with homeless individuals experiencing mental illness. The grant is provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), under the federal Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).


“This is a wonderful opportunity for Kansas,” said KDADS Secretary Tim Keck. “Our agency is committed to the development of effective ways to address homelessness, mental illness and substance abuse, and this program allows us to do that at the grass-roots level.”

SAMHSA has designated Kansas as a Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals (CABHI) state. The purpose of the CABHI-Kansas program is to strengthen state infrastructure and treatment systems to provide coordinated treatment, recovery support and permanent supported housing to individuals who experience chronic homelessness and to veterans who experience homelessness/chronic homelessness with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders.

CABHI-Kansas is taking a “Housing First” approach to connecting homeless individuals with permanent housing without preconditions such as sobriety, substance use treatment or other participation requirements. Earlier this year, the program conducted Housing First training for community health centers as well as mental health and substance treatment centers in conjunction with the University of Kansas. The Housing First model is used by all the CABHI-KS team. It is an alternative to the traditional approach in which homeless individuals are required to first participate in and complete short-term residential and treatment programs before obtaining permanent housing.

The CABHI-Kansas teams utilize evidence-based practices to provide the best services and outcomes for the clients they serve. The model also incorporates a rapid job search that is available for any individual who is looking for a job, regardless of their work history or treatment status. It is the mission of the employment teams to connect individuals with behavioral health needs to steady employment that can assist them in their path to recovery.

“Our CABHI Kansas teams in year one served more than 300 individuals in three counties, Shawnee, Wyandotte, and Sedgwick,” said Korrie Snell, CABHI Coordinator for KDADS. “Working with substance abuse providers Heartland RADAC and the Substance Abuse Center of Kansas (SACK), CABHI-Kansas has linked 135 chronically homeless individuals to permanent supported housing.”

Additionally, more than 50 individuals have obtained employment through the CABHI Individual Placement and Support (IPS) supported employment program.

KDADS Housing, Employment, and Benefits Program Manager Melissa Bogart-Starkey said, “This grant allows CABHI-Kansas teams to continue to provide services for chronically homeless individuals in need. We see positive outcomes every day.”

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Area Happenings - Week of July 23, 2017

Here are the upcoming events that the Gazette has been made aware of as of  July 23, 2017.  To submit an item to the community events calendar, please email it to press@baldwingazette.com.

July 24-27, 2017

Vacation Bible School
9 A.M. - 11 A.M.
for children ages 5-12
Register online at 
Family Night: July 27 at 7 P.M. 
Lighthouse Baptist
700 Chapel Street 
Baldwin City, KS

785-594-4101

July 27, 2017

Thankful Thursday Free Community Meal
Serving 6 to 7 pm
Ives Chapel UMC
1018 Miami
Baldwin City
Free community meals are the last Thursday of each month



August 20, 2017

Battlefield Tours Led by John Brown

As part of the Civil War on the Western Frontier activities commemorating the 154th anniversary of Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, Kansas, there will be a special tour of the Black Jack Battlefield. It will be conducted by Kerry Altenbernd as John Brown, assisted by members of the 13th Kansas Infantry Reg. re-enactor group serving as his civilian Free State militia. Maybe a few pro-slavery men will be there too.  
The re-enactors will be camping on site, so come out early and visit with them.

Time: Saturday, June 3 at 4 PM - 5 PM
Free Admission

Location: Black Jack Battlefield and Nature Park
163 E 2000th Rd
Wellsville, Kansas 66092

More Information:
(785) 380-9156
info@blackjackbattlefield.org

August 25, 2017

COME AND ENJOY OUR
COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
          TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to ?
 




HOST
VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
1724 N 692 RD
BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600

September 29, 2017

Luke Bryant Concert



 October 21-22, 2017

Maple Leaf Festival
 


Downtown Baldwin City



 October 28, 2017

COME AND ENJOY OUR
COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
          TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to ?
 


HOST
VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
1724 N 692 RD
BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600




 December 29, 2017

COME AND ENJOY OUR
COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
          TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to ?


HOST
VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
1724 N 692 RD
BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600


Third Friday Art Walk and Farmers Market

Downtown Baldwin City





Every 4th Thursday of the Month
10 A.M. - 11 A.M.
Mobile Food Bank
Baldwin City New Life Assembly of God
118 5th St  Baldwin City, KS
Stay in car, line up and drive through



Every Tuesday through October  
Eudora Local Gardening Farmer’s Market
4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Tuesdays
through October 2016
1402 Church Street
Eudora, KS.
In the parking lot of Gene’s Hartland Foods.
Local, fresh produce and foods offered by local growers and producers!


Every Wednesday through October
De Soto Farmer’s Market (Fresh Promise’s Market)
4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Wednesdays through October 2016
at The Barn at Kill Creek Farm
9200 Kill Creek Road
De Soto, KS
Local, fresh produce and foods offered by local growers and producers!


Every Thursday through October 
Cottin's Hardware Farmer's Market on Thursdays from
4:00 pm - 6:30 pm
through September
at Cottin's Hardware & Rental back parking lot
1832 Massachusetts Street
Lawrence, KS
Local vendors offer a variety of goods including produce, baked items, hot foods, meats, eggs, soaps, jams, jellies, herbs, fudge and much more!;


Every Friday through October
Perry Lecompton Farmers' Market
Fridays from 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm
at Bernie's parking lot
24 Hwy and Ferguson Road
Perry, KS
Visit the market to find fresh vegetables, fruits, homemade jams and jellies, baked goods, honey, fresh cut flowers, farm fresh eggs, handmade crafts and more!



Baldwin City Youth Competes in Junior Olympics Summer Track Events

Press Release and Photos Submitted by Scott Schoenberger


    At the USA Track and Field, Missouri Valley Regional meet at Missouri Southern State University in Joplin, Missouri, three Baldwin City youths competed for the Ottawa Track Club. The meet was held from Thursday, July 6, 2017, through Sunday, July 9, 2017. Their hope was to qualify for the 2017 USATF Hershey Junior Olympics which are being held at Rock Chalk Park in Lawrence, Kansas from July 24-30.
   On Friday, July 7, 2017, Leo Schoenberger, age 9, qualified for the Junior Olympics by finishing second in the 9/10 boys triathlon with an overall score of 459 points.   He placed second in each of the individual events which comprise the triathlon: high jump shot put and 400m dash. Leo also competed in the 9/10 boys 800m run on Saturday, July 8, and finished eleventh with a time of 2:48.53.
     On Saturday, July 8, Ethan Williams, 9, competed in the 9/10 boys 1500m run and finished fifteenth with a time of 6:27.32.
     On Sunday, July 9, Ambrynn Stewart, 14, qualified for the Junior Olympics by finishing fourth in the 15/16 girls 1500m run with a personal record time of 5:07.73. Ambrynn also competed in the 15/16 girls 800m run and finished eighth with a time of 2:33.78.
     Leo's competition in the 9/10 boys triathlon will be held on Tuesday, July 25, beginning at noon.   Ambrynn's competition in the 15/16 girls 1500m run is scheduled to begin on Thursday, July 27 at 8:40 A.M.. with the first round and culminate with the finals at approximately 1:15 P.M. on Sunday, July 30.
 ***    Here is a link for more information on the Junior Olympics - http://www.usatf.org/Events---Calendar/2017/USATF-National-Junior-Olympic-Track---Field-C.aspx ***

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Baldwin City Council Decides Local Seat Belt Fines

Kevin Surbaugh

The July 19th council meeting of Baldwin City was called to order by Marilyn Pearse. After quickly approving the consent agenda the council turned attention to public comments. This week, Baldwin City resident, Mary McGreery, approached the podium to address the city council. Her concern was the now daily music in the downtown area. Her house is within ear shot of one of the speakers which are annoying to her.
Some on the council were under the impression that the Chamber originated the request for music every day. Jeannette Blackmar, Baldwin City Chamber Director, told the council the chamber did not request the music to be constantly played over the sound system. Blackmar, did say that they did request that the city utilizes Baldwin City Radio over the CD’s that they had been playing.
Brad Smith, City Finance Director and Rob Culley, Baldwin City Power Plant Superintendent said that the speaker closest to McGreery’s house would be turned off on Wednesday (July 19, 2017) morning, except for special events, like the Maple Leaf Festival.
The council then heard from Hank Booth with a report from Baldwin City Economic Development Council (E. D. C.) of the first half of 2017. Booth started off with a ten-year overview of the E. D. C.’s accomplishments.
  • BEEP – Baldwin Energy Efficiency Program
  • Home Shows
  • Website – Commercial Inventory
  • RV Park
  • Douglas State Lake Walking Trail
  • Downtown Concerts
  • Kansas Belle Dinner Train



He then highlighted just a few of the accomplishments from 2016 and 2017.
  • Promotion of Baldwin City First
  • Baker Summit
  • Car Show - $1,000 to market show
  • Lawrence Home Show (to promote Baldwin City)
  • Promoted new CPA
  • Maintain Douglas State Fishing Lake

  • Booth then listed some of the goals for 2018.
  • Promote and support a city business park
  • promote and support residential growth
  • promote and support Baker University – our single biggest asset
  • fill gaps – a new fuel/gas station
  • annual fall promotion of Midland Railway and Kansas Belle Dinner Train

Dave Hill, E. D. C. chairman joined Booth at the podium and said that when they look at the local area they look at the entire school district, because everyone who lives in the district calls Baldwin City home.
Hill said they look to continue the scholarship program for Baldwin High students attending Baker University. He also mentioned, that he would like to see Baker implement a graduate program in Banking. To conclude their E. D. C. update, they discussed growth in the area. Growth in the city itself has been stagnate, while the rural areas have seen a 2.8 percent growth.
The council then discussed the paving of First Street, Shane Starkey, serving as the spokesperson for the seven residents asked about resident access to their homes, when construction begins. City Administrator Glenn Rodden, replied that they didn’t know at this time, but as things got closer the county engineers would make that part of their plan.
Shane Starkey
Photographer Kevin Surbaugh
Discussion ensued about the early payoff option and whether it could be done at other times, besides at the beginning of the payment start. Hill told the council that it could be done and that people in other special benefit districts have done it. The reason, Hill explained, that you might want to pay it off early is if a resident was going to move in year twelve of a twenty year payoff plan. A prospective buyer might be fine with a $6,000 tax bill, but might bulk at $2,000 more in specials. Thus, the selling resident might want to payoff the remaining amount to make the house more palatable to the prospective buyer.
The council postponed a decision to creating the First Street Benefit District until the August 1, 2017 meeting.
Council members also took up seat belt fines. The council first learned at the last meeting that the state had updated the fines for seat belt violations. As a result the city is mandated to update their ordinances. Until action is taken the city will lose money on each ticket they write. Under the new state laws, the fines go from $10 to $30 for drivers and from $10 to $60 for passengers. That means each ticket wrote before the city updates the ordinances, would result in the city sending the state $30 for the $10 it collects for a drivers infraction and $60 for the $10 it collects for each passenger infraction.
Voting under emergency authority the council passed ordinance 1376 (Uniform Public Offense Code) and ordinance 1377 (Standard Traffic Ordinance) on votes of four to one. Citing concern of transparency Council-Member David Simmons was the lone dissenting vote on both ordinances that were affected by the states updates to state law.
In Other business:
Approved, on a vote of 3-2, ordinance 1374 that rezones a plot of land owned by Casey Simoneau. Council-Member Kathy Gerstner and Christi Darnell cast the dissenting votes.
Unanimously approved the publication of the 2018 Budget hearing.

USD 348 Board of Education Discusses Capital Outlay and Inter-Local Agreement

Kevin Surbaugh

Baldwin USD 348 School Board convened it’s regular meeting on July 17, 2017, with a look at the capital outlay. The board spent most of the time looking at bus camera upgrades. Russ Harding, director of transportation said half the buses have cameras. The camera system can’t be upgraded. He cannot justify the replacing them all at once, so the plan is to replace part of them, and have two separate systems until all cameras have been replaced in a few years. The camera’s will not be replaced until the bus is coming out of service. The board unanimously approved the capital outlay fund be approved with Board-Members Sandy Chapman moved and Chad Christie seconded.

For the second meeting in a row the board heard about the Neighborhood Revitalization Program(NRP). At the last meeting Glenn Rodden, City Administrator of Baldwin City, addressed the board to see if the board would enter into an inter-local agreement to encourage growth in new construction. At the last meeting Rodden said that it would affect new residential and commercial construction inside the city limits. It however, would not affect any tax-exempt organization such as not-for-profits or government buildings.
Rodden was present again, to answer any questions the board might have.
Board-Member Sandy Chapman wondered if some in the district would feel that this agreement was favoring city residents over those outside city limits.
Board President Nick Harris, who was absent last month, said that he would like to get another month to mull over the idea, perhaps to sit down with Rodden at City Hall to learn a little more about the program.

In other business Board...

  • unanimously re-elected Nick Harris and Chard Christie as Board President and Vice-President respectfully.

  • unanimously agreed to retain Christie and Sandy Chapman as representatives to the negotiations board.
  • unanimously 
  • Monday, July 17, 2017

    University of Wyoming Spring Semester Dean's and Dean’s Freshman Honor Rolls: Kansas




    July 10, 2017 -- The University of Wyoming lists seven students from Kansas on the 2017 spring semester academic Dean's and Dean's Freshman Honor Rolls.
    signature
    The honor rolls consist of regularly enrolled undergraduates above freshman standing who earned a 3.4 or better grade-point average, and freshmen who have earned a 3.25 or better grade-point average.
    To be eligible, students must have been enrolled for a minimum of 12 credit hours taken for letter grades.

    Kansas Students are:
    Baldwin City
    Stephanie Minor
    Bonner Springs
    Katherine Xochitl Kasckow
    Lenexa 
    Marleah J. Campbell
    Maize  
    Megan L. Carpenter
    Overland Park
    Kelsey A. Hendricks
    Wichita
    Allegra Maya Carson
    Skyler Snodgrass

    Baldwin City Senior Wheels Hosts Biscuits and Gravy Fundraiser

    Kevin Surbaugh

    Bill Clemen, Baldwin City, serves the cinnamon rolls during
    the fundraiser.
    Photographer Kevin Surbaugh





    Gail Kingley, Wellsville; Oke Potter, Baldwin City;
    Pat Potter, Baldwin City and
    Anne Hivley, Ankeny, Iowa enjoyed the hot breakfast.
    Photographer Kevin Surbaugh



    Baldwin City Senior Wheels held it's annual fundraiser on Saturday July 15, 2017.   Proceeds from the breakfast fundraiser to help fund the program that provides rides to doctors.

    Sunday, July 16, 2017

    Habitat for Humanity update on President Jimmy Carter

    PR Newswire

    Photograph courtesy of  Habitat for Humanity International
    WINNIPEG, Manitoba - Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Rosalynn Carter returned to the Habitat for Humanity build site in Winnipeg this morning. They attended the daily morning devotional at 8 a.m. kicking off the last day of Habitat's 34th Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project.
    President Carter was discharged from St. Boniface General Hospital early this morning after being admitted briefly for rehydration.
    From July 9-14, President and Mrs. Carter joined thousands of volunteers for Habitat's Carter Work Project to build 150 homes across Canada in celebration of the country's 150th anniversary.

    Baldwin City Council Agenda - July 18, 2017

    Baldwin City Council Meeting Agenda

    Baldwin City Public Library
    800 7th Street
    Baldwin City, KS 66006

    TUESDAY
    July 18, 2017
    7:00 PM
    A. Call to Order- Mayor Marilyn Pearse
    B. Consent Agenda
    1. Minutes of the July 05, 2017 Regular Meeting
    2. Special Event - Baldwin City Living Magazine Launch Party
    C. Public Comment:
    Members of the public are welcome to comment on items relating to City business not listed on this
    Agenda. Please stand and wait to be recognized by the Mayor. As a general practice, the comments may or may not be acted upon by the Council during the meeting, or Council may refer the items to staff for follow up.
    If you wish to comment on an item listed on the Agenda, a sign-up sheet is provided for you to sign in and provide your address. You will be called on when the Agenda item of interest is under discussion by the Council.
    D. Special Reports or Presentations
    1. Council retreat follow-up- John Divine
    2. Hank Booth - Yearly report
    3. Jeannette Blackmar- Chamber Report
    E. Old Business
    1. Resolution 2017-12 - Improvement District discussion
    2. Ordinance 1374 - Simoneau rezoning
    F. New Business
    1. Ordinance 1376 - Uniform Public Offense Code
    2. Ordinance 1377 - Standard Traffic Ordinance
    3. Ordinance 1375 - Amending Ordinance 1350 seat belts
    4. 2018 Budget Hearing publication
    G. Committee and/or Commission Reports
    1. Budget and Finance - Kathy Gerstner, David Simmons
    2. Community Development Committee - A.J. Stevens, Tony Brown
    3. Public Health and Safety Committee - David Simmons, Kathy Gerstner
    4. Public Works Committee - Christi Darnell, A.J. Stevens
    5. Utilities Committee - Tony Brown, Christi Darnell
    H. City Administrator and Staff comments
    1. Brad Smith - Audit report
    2. Chris Croucher - dangerous meters
    I. Council & Mayor Comments
    J. Executive Session
    K. Adjourn

    Area Happenings - Week of July 16, 2017

    Here are the upcoming events that the Gazette has been made aware of as of  July 15, 2017.  To submit an item to the community events calendar, please email it to press@baldwingazette.com.


    July 17, 2017

    Baldwin Board of Education
    7 P.M. (public meeting)
    Baldwin Elementary Primary School 
    500 Lawrence St 
    Baldwin City, KS

    July 18, 2017

    Baldwin City Council Meeting
    7 P.M.
    Baldwin City Library

    July 19, 2017
     Community Blood Drive

    9 A.M. - 4 P.M.

    Baldwin Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center 
    (in the Basement)
    1223 Orchard Lane

    To make an appointment: 
    Call Kaitlynn Flowers 785-594-6492
    -or-
    visit:
     www.redcrossblood.org (use Sponsor Code: Baldwin)
    -or-
    Call: 1-800-Red-Cross


    July 22, 2017

    Triple Tri Triathlon
    New Name, Same Triathlon!

    Seventh annual Triathlon in Baldwin City.
    Offering three different races depending on age and ability.

    Encouraging everyone to challenge themselves!
    All participants receive an event T-shirt and a Participation medal.

    Prize for the overall Male and Female winners.
    Medals are given to the various age group winners.
    Ribbons will be given for 2nd and 3rd place age group winners.


    Entry Fees:
    $50 Individual
     $100 Team Relay
     $25 Youth
     if registered by July 14
    All fees increase after July 14.
    Registration is available the day of the race
    The three races are:
    SPRINT COURSE - ages 12 & up - 300m swim, 12 mile bike, and 5k run - starts at 7:00 am -
    SHORT COURSE - ages 12 & up - 100m swim, 4 mile bike, and 1 mile run - starts at 7:00 am
    YOUTH COURSE - ages 3 & up (under 5 w/parent) - 50m swim, 1.5 mile bike, and .5 mile run - starts at 10:00 am
    There is a TEAM (of 2-3) Relay for the Sprint Course


    July 24-27, 2017

    Vacation Bible School
    9 A.M. - 11 A.M.
    for children ages 5-12
    Register online at 
    Family Night: July 27 at 7 P.M. 
    Lighthouse Baptist
    700 Chapel Street 
    Baldwin City, KS

    785-594-4101

    July 27, 2017

    Thankful Thursday Free Community Meal
    Serving 6 to 7 pm
    Ives Chapel UMC
    1018 Miami
    Baldwin City
    Free community meals are the last Thursday of each month



    August 20, 2017

    Battlefield Tours Led by John Brown

    As part of the Civil War on the Western Frontier activities commemorating the 154th anniversary of Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, Kansas, there will be a special tour of the Black Jack Battlefield. It will be conducted by Kerry Altenbernd as John Brown, assisted by members of the 13th Kansas Infantry Reg. reenactor group serving as his civilian Free State militia. Maybe a few pro-slavery men will be there too.  
    The reenactors will be camping on site, so come out early and visit with them.

    Time: Saturday, June 3 at 4 PM - 5 PM
    Free Admission

    Location: Black Jack Battlefield and Nature Park
    163 E 2000th Rd
    Wellsville, Kansas 66092

    More Information:
    (785) 380-9156
    info@blackjackbattlefield.org

    August 25, 2017

    COME AND ENJOY OUR
    COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
              TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to ?
        

       


    HOST
    VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
    1724 N 692 RD
    BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600



     October 21-22, 2017

    Maple Leaf Festival
        


    Downtown Baldwin City



     October 28, 2017

    COME AND ENJOY OUR
    COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
              TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to ?
        


    HOST
    VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
    1724 N 692 RD
    BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600




     December 29, 2017

    COME AND ENJOY OUR
    COMMUNITY DINNER  & FELLOWSHIP
              TO BE HELD  AT 6:00  to ?


    HOST
    VINLAND UNITED CHURCH
    1724 N 692 RD
    BALDWIN CITY, KS 6600


    Third Friday Art Walk and Farmers Market

    Downtown Baldwin City





    Every 4th Thursday of the Month
    10 A.M. - 11 A.M.
    Mobile Food Bank
    Baldwin City New Life Assembly of God
    118 5th St  Baldwin City, KS
    Stay in car, line up and drive through



    Every Tuesday through October  
    Eudora Local Gardening Farmer’s Market
    4:30 pm – 6:30 pm Tuesdays
    through October 2016
    1402 Church Street
    Eudora, KS.
    In the parking lot of Gene’s Hartland Foods.
    Local, fresh produce and foods offered by local growers and producers!


    Every Wednesday through October
    De Soto Farmer’s Market (Fresh Promise’s Market)
    4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
    Wednesdays through October 2016
    at The Barn at Kill Creek Farm
    9200 Kill Creek Road
    De Soto, KS
    Local, fresh produce and foods offered by local growers and producers!


    Every Thursday through October 
    Cottin's Hardware Farmer's Market on Thursdays from
    4:00 pm - 6:30 pm
    through September
    at Cottin's Hardware & Rental back parking lot
    1832 Massachusetts Street
    Lawrence, KS
    Local vendors offer a variety of goods including produce, baked items, hot foods, meats, eggs, soaps, jams, jellies, herbs, fudge and much more!;


    Every Friday through October
    Perry Lecompton Farmers' Market
    Fridays from 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm
    at Bernie's parking lot
    24 Hwy and Ferguson Road
    Perry, KS
    Visit the market to find fresh vegetables, fruits, homemade jams and jellies, baked goods, honey, fresh cut flowers, farm fresh eggs, handmade crafts and more!



    Shark Tank Superstar Daymond John Urges ASI’s Chicago Audience To “Keep Swimming”

    PRweb

    Chicago, IL -  Reality TV co-host and FUBU founder Daymond John delivered a rousing motivational keynote on Thursday at a trade show hosted by the Advertising Specialty Institute®, urging a standing-room-only audience of entrepreneurs to “just keep swimming.”
    Throughout his fast-paced presentation during ASI Show® Chicago at the McCormick Place convention center, John challenged suppliers and distributors in the $23 billion promotional products industry to follow his five “Shark Points” to achieve success in both life and business. But in the end, he said, “It all comes down to love.”
    John punctuated his talk – which was funny, poignant and jam-packed with inspiration – with videos, sound effects, funky music and personal photos of celebrity friends like Michael Jackson, Muhammad Ali and Prince. “Never forget that you are the brand,” he said, advising the audience to choose a handful of precise words to describe themselves, adding, “When you know that, then you can master the pitch. On Shark Tank, we do not invest in companies, we invest in people.”
    Raised by a single mom in Queens, New York, John got his entrepreneurial start selling hats, marketing his fledgling brand by spray-painting FUBU throughout the city. After achieving phenomenal success, he transitioned to TV, co-hosting the Emmy Award-winning Shark Tank, in which budding entrepreneurs compete for the chance to make their dreams reality.
    “The keynote with Daymond John was very inspirational and definitely gave me fuel to go back and kick my own brand to a new level,” said Brian Stout, of Go Earn It (asi/208849). “The biggest thing by far I got from him was that you need to represent the brand – you are the brand.”
    ASI Show Chicago, which opened Tuesday, was attended by 615 exhibitors and 3,776 distributors from 44 states and 13 countries, including 541 companies from Illinois, 242 women-owned companies and 215 minority-owned companies. All told, 19 distributors also chose ASI Chicago, the largest promotional products trade show of the summer, to host their sales meetings, 15 of which are Top 100 companies.
    Distributor Christine Marion, of Fully Promoted (asi/384000), raved about the show. “ASI Chicago is the one show I come to that the vendors want to take the time to share with you their great ideas, new products and, most importantly, how to use them and how to solve problems. Our group comes to shows like this to get ideas, learn how to use products differently, build relationships and network.”
    Supplier Carthage Barry, of Landway (asi/66238) said his company has exhibited at ASI Show Chicago for over 10 years because it’s the biggest show in the Midwest. “Attendance this year has been great,” said Barry. “I’ve had a lot of good conversations with distributors, some new, but also a lot of our existing customers. We’ve been around for a while and have established ourselves in the industry, so it’s great that our customers now make it a point to stop and see us.”
    Rita Ugianskis-Fishman, senior vice president and general manager of ASI Show, said she was thrilled with the encouraging response and was already looking forward to ASI’s 2018 shows in Orlando, Dallas and Chicago. Registration opens July 31.
    “ASI Show is proud of our long record of consistently delivering trade shows that offer great value for both attendees and exhibitors,” said Ugianskis-Fishman. “No matter how far we advance in terms of online gatherings, nothing will ever replace the value of face-to-face product sourcing, networking and relationship building.”
    Timothy M. Andrews, ASI president and chief executive officer, said he was particularly delighted with the strong attendance on Education Day and hoped all distributors continue to advance their sales and marketing skills by taking full advantage of ASI’s free online classes. “Education really is the key to success,” said Andrews.
    On Wednesday, at a prestigious black-tie event at the historic Morgan Manufacturing, ASI also announced winners of the 2017 Counselor® Awards, including Boundless CEO Henrik Johansson as Person of the Year and PFConcept CEO Ralf Oster as International Person of the Year.
    The awards, chosen by the editors of ASI’s award­-winning Counselor magazine, recognize outstanding individuals and companies in 11 categories.

    Wednesday, July 12, 2017

    Kansas First Lady Mary Brownback announces 7th annual Kansas Book Festival

    Press Release

    Topeka – Kansas First Lady Mary Brownback today announced the 7th annual Kansas Book Festival will take place 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, September 9, at the Kansas State Capitol. The festival will feature current authors and books and is focused on enforcing the importance of reading.

    “Our mission is to promote literacy and encourage a life-long love of reading. The festival is one of the key ways that we are able to live out our mission,” Brownback said. “We have a great lineup assembled of locally and nationally known authors and illustrators that everyone will enjoy. And as always, there is something for everyone.”

    Last year’s event drew an estimated 2,000 people at last year’s event. Headlining this year’s event will be children’s author Andrea Davis Pinkney (A Poem for Peter). Pinkney is the New York Times bestselling and award-winning author of numerous books for children and young adults, including picture books, novels, works of historical fiction and nonfiction. Among her list of accolades are multiple Coretta Scott King awards and American Library Association Notable Book citations.

    Thirty authors are set to speak, including Candice Millard (Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, A Daring Escape and the Making of Winston Churchill), Tom Clavin (Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson and the Wickedest Town in the American West) and Joshilyn Jackson (Almost Sisters and The Opposite of Everyone). Along with author presentations, there will also be additional authors featured as vendors, book sales and signings, entertainment, live music, appearances by storybook characters Clifford and Curious George and activities for children of all ages. This event is free and open to the public.

    For more details concerning the Kansas Book Festival and a full list of slated authors please visit www.kansasbookfestival.com or www.facebook.com/KansasBookFestival.

    Tuesday, July 11, 2017

    Survey Reveals Top Five Phone Scams People Fall Victim To In Kansas


    Press Release

    With 89% of people in Kansas receiving between 5 and 30 nuisance calls per week, telephone scams are still causing major problems for consumers. The issue has become so widespread that almost a fifth of Kansas adults admit they have been a victim of a telephone scam.

    The YouGov survey commissioned by CPR Call Blocker, makers of the best selling call blocking device in the US, also revealed the top five scams people are falling victim to in Kansas:  

    •   Internal Revenue scam
    • Credit/loan scam
    • Robocall/automated messages scam
    • Lottery/sweepstake scam
    • Missed call scam

    Many of these scams rely on the victim handing over personal and security details or asking the victim to pay a processing fee or call back on a premium rate line.

    While many of us are becoming increasingly savvy when it comes to spotting a scam, 17% of those questioned have lost money to scams in the last 12 months. Of those, 23% lost less than $100, 22% lost between $100 and $500, but 27% lost between $500 and $10,000, with 4% were scammed out of over $10,000.

    Bryony Hipkin at CPR Call Blocker, comments: "Scam and nuisance phone calls continue to be a major problem for consumers in Kansas and it's often the most vulnerable people in society who are falling victim to telephone scams. Scammers have a real knack of finding people when they are at their weakest and most vulnerable and they really exploit that. I want to encourage people to stay in touch with their senior loved ones. A lot of scammers are using the tactic of getting to know that person, becoming a friend to them and then on the fourth or fifth call they start making the request.

    "Our customer base tends to be those aged 55 and over who want to eliminate nuisance and scam calls for good. By being able to block nuisance phone numbers through the touch of a button, our customers have seen a 90%-100% reduction in the number of calls received depending on how they choose to use the product.

    "If you're contacted out of the blue, be suspicious and never respond to an unsolicited call. Don't assume a caller is genuine because they have information about you such as your account details. Never give out personal information when answering an incoming call and if you're not convinced the call is genuine, hang up and call back using the official phone number of the organisation calling from their website or any paperwork you have such as statements."

    CPR Call Blocker's industry leading technology prevents nuisance and scam calls through a device attached to a customer's phone. When a nuisance call is received, customers press a button on the call blocker which permanently blocks incoming calls from that number. The device is already pre-programmed with up to 2,000 of the most notorious scam phone numbers and can store up to an additional 1,500 nuisance numbers.

    CPR Call Blocker is the bestselling and most trusted call blocker brand worldwide. The CPR suite of call blockers are available from CallBlockerUSA and Amazon.